$72 million development breaks ground in Grand Rapids

A two-tower development that will redefine the heart the Grand Rapids downtown landscape broke ground Tuesday. The $72 million development at the corner of Ottawa Avenue and Pearl Street in downtown Grand Rapids will construct two buildings, a 15-story office building that will be home to the Warner, Norcross and Judd law firm as well as Chemical Bank, and a 12-story Hyatt Place Hotel with a restaurant on the ground floor. Orion Construction’s Public Relations Coordinator Jason Wheeler says...

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A study conducted by researchers at the University of Michigan concluded this week that residents enrolled in the state's expanded Medicaid program saw improvements to both their health and job performance. In addition, Medicaid had positive effects on both the employed and out of work who were enrolled in the Healthy Michigan plan.

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The Michigan Senate has given final approval to legislation raising registration taxes and safety training fees for motorcyclists.
 
     The bill passed 33-2 Wednesday would increase the annual registration fee to $25 - a $2 increase. It would boost initial endorsement fees to $16 from $13.50 and renewals to $7 from $5.
 
     The additional registration fee revenue would go toward an existing motorcycle safety education program, while some of the endorsement fee revenue would fund a new program promoting motorcycle awareness.
 

coindesk.com

A ruling that outraged charities in Michigan could be overturned. The state Senate passed a bill today to bring back roadside donation collections.

Last August the attorney general nixed roadside donation collections. He said they were illegal.

This shut down a lucrative way for charities to get donations.  

Monty Nye is with the Michigan Professional Firefighters Union. He says their donations for the Muscular Dystrophy Association got cut in half last year. That’s because they weren’t able to do their annual “fill the boot” drive.

A longtime staffer at the Michigan Secretary of State's office has been appointed director of the Michigan Bureau of Elections. Secretary of State Ruth Johnson announced Wednesday that Sally Williams will replace Chris Thomas, who retires this week after 36 years as director. Williams currently serves as the bureau's Election Liaison Division director, assisting county clerks and local clerks in their election duties, and oversees training of local election officials. Before that, she was an assistant to the chief of staff and as a project manager.

The late Niagara Falls daredevil Kirk Jones may have brought a boa constrictor along on his ill-fated attempt to go over the falls in an inflatable ball. The Niagara Gazette (http://bit.ly/2smGwI8 ) reports Wednesday that New York State Park Police found a website with a photo of Jones and the 7-foot snake previewing Jones' plans. An unoccupied large plastic ball he apparently planned to ride over the falls was found empty below the falls on April 19. Jones' body was recovered June 2. There's been no sign of the snake.

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USA Gymnastics announced Tuesday that it will adopt all 70 of the recommendations in an independent review of its policies about reporting abuse. An investigation by The Indianapolis Star last year found that at least 368 gymnasts have alleged they were sexually assaulted by adults working in the sport.

Boaty McBoatface is back.

And according to the British Antarctic Survey, the world's most famous unmanned submersible returned from its inaugural voyage last week with a trove of "unprecedented data about some of the coldest abyssal ocean waters on earth."

The Trump administration is expected Thursday to announce how it will implement its modified travel ban, following the Supreme Court's decision on Monday lifting a stay on the executive order imposed by two lower courts.

A federal appeals court paved the way on Wednesday for Ohio to resume executions by lifting a lower court's decision to halt the state's lethal injection process.

It was a contentious decision that split the 6th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals judges in an 8-6 vote.

In the case brought by death row inmates, the judges focused on the effects of the sedative midazolam, one of the three lethal injection drugs used by Ohio.

A study conducted by researchers at the University of Michigan concluded this week that residents enrolled in the state's expanded Medicaid program saw improvements to both their health and job performance. In addition, Medicaid had positive effects on both the employed and out of work who were enrolled in the Healthy Michigan plan.

wikipedia

The Michigan Senate has given final approval to legislation raising registration taxes and safety training fees for motorcyclists.
 
     The bill passed 33-2 Wednesday would increase the annual registration fee to $25 - a $2 increase. It would boost initial endorsement fees to $16 from $13.50 and renewals to $7 from $5.
 
     The additional registration fee revenue would go toward an existing motorcycle safety education program, while some of the endorsement fee revenue would fund a new program promoting motorcycle awareness.
 

coindesk.com

A ruling that outraged charities in Michigan could be overturned. The state Senate passed a bill today to bring back roadside donation collections.

Last August the attorney general nixed roadside donation collections. He said they were illegal.

This shut down a lucrative way for charities to get donations.  

Monty Nye is with the Michigan Professional Firefighters Union. He says their donations for the Muscular Dystrophy Association got cut in half last year. That’s because they weren’t able to do their annual “fill the boot” drive.

For the first time, the number of children paralyzed by mutant strains of the polio vaccine are greater than the number of children paralyzed by polio itself.

So far in 2017, there have been only six cases of "wild" polio reported anywhere in the world. By "wild," public health officials mean the disease caused by polio virus found naturally in the environment.

Copyright 2017 Fresh Air. To see more, visit Fresh Air.

DAVE DAVIES, HOST:

Updated at 3:30 p.m. ET

Americans may be celebrating 241 years of independence this Fourth of July, but they won't be liberated from their cars on what's forecast to be the "most traveled Independence Day holiday" ever.

AAA says that 44.2 million Americans are expected to travel 50 miles or more from home, with the vast majority on the road. That's an increase of nearly 3 percent from the year before, or more than a million people.

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