Republicans lawmakers are continuing to try to change retirement benefits in Michigan. This time municipal employees such as police and firefighters are on the agenda.

The bills would aggressively scale back retiree health benefits in cities with high unfunded liability costs.

Opponents say it would make recruitment more difficult.

“This is also a benefit that’s been promised. It’s a sacrifice that officers have made.”

      

Incarnate, a horror thriller opens in west Michigan theaters today, along with the Christmas drama Believe, plus four indie movies.  WGVU talks with Celebration Cinema's Ron Van Timmeran and Eric Kuiper.

Tree lighting hopes to draw people downtown all winter

15 hours ago
Daniel Boothe

Downtown Grand Rapids will sparkle a little brighter after Friday evening as city officials will kick off the holiday season with the lighting of the Grand Rapids Christmas Tree.

While the event has taken place for a number of years, the ceremony changed its name this year to “Light up Downtown.” Andy Guy the COO of Downtown Grand Rapids Inc. says, the name change is not only in reference to the holiday lights that will glow throughout the city, but also in the hopes of keeping the revitalized downtown area thriving during the winter months.

Michigan Gov. Rick Snyder has ordered flags to be lowered to honor a Detroit police officer killed in the line of duty.

Early Learning Neighborhood Collaborative

Weekly we focus on the work of area organizations advancing inclusion and equity in our community. This morning we hear from representatives of the Early Learning Neighborhood Collaborative, including Eva Martinez, Outreach & Community Liaison Manager, and Tim Dam, Grants Manager, here to speak to their mission to create and provide targeted neighborhood collaborative partners with technical, developmental and educational support in order to increase the accessibility of early educational resources for vulnerable children.

More News

This week in race: Sports (dog) whistles, protection for Dreamers, a special book—and some hunky calendar men. Really.

Now that the turkey endorphins have worn off, the leftovers are a distant memory, and the Obamas prepare for their last Christmas in the White House, we thought we'd put some of the things that happened over the holiday weekend (and this week) on a platter and offer them to you. No thank you notes required.

Race and Immigration:

Republicans lawmakers are continuing to try to change retirement benefits in Michigan. This time municipal employees such as police and firefighters are on the agenda.

The bills would aggressively scale back retiree health benefits in cities with high unfunded liability costs.

Opponents say it would make recruitment more difficult.

“This is also a benefit that’s been promised. It’s a sacrifice that officers have made.”

      

If you're curious about what people really think about some of the hottest of hot-button food controversies, the Pew Research Center has just the thing for you: a survey of attitudes toward genetic modification, organic food and the importance of eating healthfully.

The survey results are published in a 99-page report that can keep you occupied for days. But if you're pressed for time, here are some of the most interesting highlights that caught our eye.

For six years, Haitian activists have demanded that the United Nations accept responsibility for cholera in Haiti.

Yet many seemed almost shocked on Thursday by U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon's apology for the U.N.'s role in the outbreak. Shocked — and pleased.

Incarnate, a horror thriller opens in west Michigan theaters today, along with the Christmas drama Believe, plus four indie movies.  WGVU talks with Celebration Cinema's Ron Van Timmeran and Eric Kuiper.

In the northern Syrian city of Aleppo, tens of thousands of people have fled a brutal, Russian-backed regime offensive against rebel-held parts of the city. Many have fled deeper into the tightening siege, which started over the summer. Others have sought safety on the government-held side.

My conversation with a woman who recently fled the siege begins with her asking how I am. She's safe now, but is still afraid to give her name. She fears for her son — still fighting with the rebels — and for other male relatives who've been detained by the regime for questioning.

The Dallas County District Attorney has reached an agreement to drop assault charges against former Cleveland Browns quarterback Johnny Manziel, as long he as meets conditions such as attending an anger management course and a substance abuse program.

Each year, a glowing mass of clouds forms over the South Pole, high in the atmosphere, trapped between Earth and space.

From the ground they look wispy and shimmery, like a blue-white aurora borealis. From space, they look like an electric-blue gossamer haze.

Retired Gen. James Mattis' nomination to be President-elect Donald Trump's secretary of defense may, well, march through the Senate, but there is one potential obstacle to maneuver around: the retired general part.

The National Security Act of 1947, which established the current national defense structure, had a key stipulation, requiring that the secretary of defense be a civilian well removed from military service. In fact, the law is quite clear:

Friday afternoon, four candidates for Democratic National Committee chair will gather in Denver to debate the future of the embattled party.

For Minnesota Rep. Keith Ellison, the forum will be a chance to respond to a growing backlash against his bid to run the DNC.

Ellison appeared to be the early favorite when he entered the race. He earned endorsements from two powerful voices – Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders and incoming Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer.

Pages