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Hauenstein family announces multi-million dollar gift to three West Michigan institutions

Ralph D. Hauenstein, the son of philanthropist Ralph W. Hauenstein carried out his late father’s wishes Monday announcing financial gifts to three West Michigan institutions. “I think his life was exemplary of where he’s placed his fortune. Represented here are the mind, the body and the soul and the health of all three,” said Brian Hauenstein, the Grandson of philanthropist Colonel Ralph W. Hauenstein who passed away in January 2016. Monday, a financial gift of $3.5 million dollars was...

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Attorneys general from three states say a $275 million federal plan for keeping Asian carp from migrating into the Great Lakes is too pricey and rejects the most effective solution.
 
     The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is recommending technologies such as electric barriers and water cannons at the Brandon Road Lock and Dam near Joliet, Illinois, which stands between the carp-infested Illinois River and Lake Michigan.
 

A state employee charged in the Flint water scandal is returning to court for a possible plea deal with the attorney general's office.
 
     Online records at District Court in Flint show Adam Rosenthal is scheduled for a plea Tuesday. He's charged with three felonies and a misdemeanor, including tampering with the results of lead tests.
 
     A message seeking comment was left for his lawyer Monday. The attorney general's office declined to comment. Rosenthal has been suspended with pay at the Michigan Department of Environmental Quality.
 

gvsu.edu / Grand Valley State University

Ralph D. Hauenstein, the son of philanthropist Ralph W. Hauenstein carried out his late father’s wishes Monday announcing financial gifts to three West Michigan institutions.

“I think his life was exemplary of where he’s placed his fortune. Represented here are the mind, the body and the soul and the health of all three,” said Brian Hauenstein, the Grandson of philanthropist Colonel Ralph W. Hauenstein who passed away in January 2016.

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Michigan’s U.S. Senators recently sent a letter to the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers asking why it’s taking so long to finalize its plan for keeping Asian carp from reaching the Great Lakes.

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WGVU spoke with Michigan U.S. Senator Debbie Stabenow about the delay.

A government panel is scheduled for a briefing on a recent agreement between Michigan officials and the company that operates twin oil pipelines in the Straits of Mackinac. The Michigan Pipeline Safety Advisory Board will discuss the deal during its quarterly meeting Monday in Lansing. 

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