Law enforcement officials have asked Governor Rick Snyder to shut down his administration’s investigation into the state’s handling of the Flint water crisis. They say it’s conflicting with their criminal inquiries.

The issue is state employees were told they had to talk to Michigan State Police officers conducting the Snyder administration’s investigation or lose their jobs. They were also promised their statements would not be used against them in court. 

Michigan's 28 community colleges will receive smaller funding increases than anticipated.

Their funding is going up 1.4 percent overall, or $4.4 million, in the state budget that will take effect in October.

A conference committee approved the $396 million community colleges budget Thursday.

It is the first of 18 individual pieces of the budget to be hashed out since key lawmakers and Gov. Rick Snyder's administration reached a framework agreement after tax revenue projections were revised downward and anticipated Medicaid costs were adjusted upward.

Brian Turner via Wikimedia | CC BY 2.0

A Lansing-area doctor who served in the state Legislature has agreed to pay $173,000 to Blue Cross Blue Shield of Michigan before he's sentenced for making false statements.

Paul DeWeese pleaded guilty on May 5 and will return to Grand Rapids federal court for his sentence on Aug. 22.

DeWeese's clinic, NBO Medical, performed nerve block injections.

But DeWeese was required to tell Blue Cross Blue Shield that he had signed off on procedures performed by nurse practitioners.

The government says DeWeese sometimes gave his log-in information to others.

wgvu.org

At the corner of Sheldon Avenue SE and Highland Street SE there’s a Grand Rapids inner-city baseball diamond receiving some much needed care. A grant totaling nearly $55,000 from the Baseball Tomorrow Fund paid for renovations to Ted Rasberry Field, and Wednesday a ribbon cutting took place dedicating the ballpark.

“On behalf of the Rasberry family we are so happy, so excited and so grateful.”

artmuseumgr.org

Today we wrap up our series featuring the four sections of the Grand Rapids Art Museums new exhibition: The Collection in Context. We’ve explored Faith and its Symbols, Representing Women and The Evolving Landscape. GRAM Chief Curator, Ron Platt, is our guide. Our final stop on the tour: Nature-based Abstraction.   

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Lawmakers: They're just like us!

"Everyone's favorite parlor game right now in D.C. is who will be the vice presidential pick," Congressional Hispanic Caucus Chairwoman Linda Sanchez, D-Calif., said at a briefing with reporters.

Every four years, the guessing game around the "veepstakes" reaches fever pitch right around now, when the nominating conventions are just weeks away. Democratic lawmakers are rich in opinions on who Hillary Clinton should tap as her running mate.

It's been five years since NASA retired the space shuttle, ending a federal program that employed some 10,000 people around Cape Canaveral, Fla.

The loss of those jobs was a blow to Florida's Space Coast, an area closely identified with NASA and the nation's space program. But the region's economy is bouncing back and attracting companies that are in a new space race.

If you've been following the Democratic presidential contest, you might be wondering how it is possible that Bernie Sanders seems to have all the energy and enthusiasm and, yet, Hillary Clinton is way ahead in the race to the nomination.

A listener named Gerard Allen wrote into the NPR Politics Podcast with an observation:

"Seventy-one years ago, on a bright, cloudless morning, death fell from the sky and the world was changed," President Obama said, in the first visit by a sitting U.S. president to Hiroshima, Japan.

In 1945 the United States dropped the first atomic bomb used in warfare on that city, killing an estimated 140,000 people. A second bomb was dropped on Nagasaki three days later. Within weeks, Japan surrendered, ending the war in the Pacific Theater.

Nineteen people have been rescued from a cave in south central Kentucky, officials say. Seventeen cavers and two police officers who tried to help them had been trapped by floodwaters in Hidden River Cave, WBKO reports.

A germ that can't be treated with an antibiotic that is often used as the last resort has shown up for the first time in the United States.

Government scientists say the case is cause for serious concern but doesn't pose any immediate public health threat.

The germ was discovered in a 49-year-old woman in Pennsylvania with a urinary tract infection. The infection was caused by E. coli bacteria that had a gene that made them resistant to an antibiotic known as colistin.

Law enforcement officials have asked Governor Rick Snyder to shut down his administration’s investigation into the state’s handling of the Flint water crisis. They say it’s conflicting with their criminal inquiries.

The issue is state employees were told they had to talk to Michigan State Police officers conducting the Snyder administration’s investigation or lose their jobs. They were also promised their statements would not be used against them in court. 

The deep-sea researchers were surveying an ocean ridge off the coast of Hawaii in 2015 and amid ordinary ocean floor fare — a bit of coral, some volcanic rock — they came across something surprising.

"Where did this guy come from? Holy cow!" one researcher said to his colleague.

Michigan's 28 community colleges will receive smaller funding increases than anticipated.

Their funding is going up 1.4 percent overall, or $4.4 million, in the state budget that will take effect in October.

A conference committee approved the $396 million community colleges budget Thursday.

It is the first of 18 individual pieces of the budget to be hashed out since key lawmakers and Gov. Rick Snyder's administration reached a framework agreement after tax revenue projections were revised downward and anticipated Medicaid costs were adjusted upward.

Louisiana's hate-crime protections now cover law enforcement and first responders. Gov. John Bel Edwards signed the legislation on Thursday after it had passed easily in the Republican-controlled Legislature, NPR's Debbie Elliott reports.

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