Daniel Boothe

Grand Rapids Police twice as likely to pull over African-American drivers, study finds

Results from a recent study found that Grand Rapids Police are twice as likely to pull over African-American motorists than they are non-black motorists. “We are here to share the results of our race base study that looked at traffic stops conducted by the Grand Rapids Police Department," Grand Rapids City Manager Greg Sundstrom said at one of five town halls the city hosted. "Unfortunately, I have to share with you this evening, the results are far inferior to what we had hoped. The study...

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May Cause Love

3 hours ago
Kassi Underwood

Our guest is Kassi Underwood, author of May Cause Love: An Unexpected Journey of Enlightenment After Abortion.

Kassi has been published in The New York Times, The Atlantic online, The Rumpus, Refinery29, Guernica, The New York Daily News, and elsewhere. She holds an M.F.A. in literary nonfiction from Columbia University, where she taught for three years on the faculty of the Undergraduate Writing Program.

ArtPrize / artprize.org

An international art competition in western Michigan has announced that it's changing its voting structure as it gears up for its ninth year.

ArtPrize held its annual Premiere Event on Thursday to prepare for ArtPrize Nine's Sept. 20 kickoff.

Jaenell Woods, the organization's communications manager, says voting is done in two rounds.

The first narrows the entries down to 20 chosen by the public and 20 by an expert jury.

The Michigan Department of Environmental Quality will co-host a conference on developing eco-friendly infrastructure projects.

Organizers say it will be the first conference focused on using green infrastructure across the landscape with a primary goal of protecting surface waters in the Great Lakes region.

The event is scheduled for May 31 through June 2 at Cobo Center in Detroit.

Movie Talk

Apr 21, 2017
film reels
DRs Kulturarvsprojekt via Wikimedia | CC BY 3.0 / Wikimedia.org

More than a dozen new movies opening this weekend in theaters across West Michigan. Celebration!  Cinema's Ron Van Timmeren stops by previewing Disney's Born in China, Katherine Heigl in Unforgettable and true-life drama, Lost City of Z just to name a few.

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Grand Rapids Police Department / grcity.us

Police have arrested three demonstrators after a Grand Rapids protest against federal immigration policy blocked traffic.

MLive reports about 40 people participated in the protest Thursday that at one point blocked traffic near the Gerald R. Ford Federal Building in downtown Grand Rapids.

Police say that after issuing several warnings, they arrested two men aged 64 and 40 and a 49-year-old woman for impeding traffic and resisting and obstructing.

They say the remaining protesters continued to a nearby plaza without further incident.

More News

A couple of years ago, Kiev business journalist Yuliya Savostina decided to try an experiment: to spend a year living off food and other goods produced exclusively in Ukraine.

Inspired by the local food movement in the United States, Savostina started a blog to document her experience. She didn't expect it to last very long.

Updated at 11:50 p.m. ET

Emmanuel Macron, a centrist politician who's never held elective office, and Marine Le Pen, the far-right firebrand who wants to take France out of the European Union, are expected to advance to next month's runoff for the presidency of the country, according to official results.

Kuki Gallmann, a conservationist best known for her book I Dreamed of Africa, was ambushed and shot while she drove across her conservancy in Kenya Sunday morning.

Gallmann, 73, was shot in the stomach and "severely injured" while surveying her property with rangers of the Kenya Wildlife Service, according to her brother-in-law Nigel Adams and a press release from a farmers' association of which she's a member.

She was flown to a hospital in Nairobi for treatment, and was still conscious and speaking after the attack, according to The New York Times.

Not long ago, both the Economist and the New Yorker magazines featured unflattering cover portraits of President Trump holding a golf club. Both seemed to suggest the president had found himself in a rough patch.

Inside a tiny, hard-to-find storefront in Brooklyn lies the darkly whimsical world of a most unusual "candy alchemist."

He calls himself "Eugene J.," and this real-life Willy Wonka is whipping up his own new confections across town from where Roald Dahl's Charlie and the Chocolate Factory will open on Broadway later this month.

Not much is known about this quiet man in black, who prefers to keep the focus on the candy. Behind a purple satin curtain, he toils away on his latest invention.

This story is part of Kitchen Table Conversations, a series from NPR's National Desk that examines how Americans from all walks of life are moving forward from the presidential election. This is the third post-election visit with Jamie Ruppert, 33, of White Haven, Pa.

Jamie Ruppert, 33, switched parties and voted for Donald Trump in November, and for months has been his enthusiastic supporter.

The 700 cows on Brett Reinford's dairy farm are making more than just milk.

Each day, the girls are producing 7,000 gallons of manure. And that smells exactly like you'd imagine. "We had gotten complaints from neighbors in the past that had said, 'Hey, it stinks too much. Can you do something about it?' " Reinford says.

So he looked around for a solution and landed on a device called a digester. A digester tamps down the smell a bit, but, more importantly, it takes all that cow poop and converts it to electricity.

With student debt at a staggering $1.3 trillion, many families are facing a huge financial dilemma: Their final springtime decisions about college enrollment and acceptance. The NPR Ed team teamed up with Weekend Edition to answer some listener questions about debt and degrees.

Waiting on the numbers

Marcy, from Union City, N.J. has twin girls going off to college in September.

With any new president, there's a learning curve. But for President Trump, it's been steeper than others.

"Mount Everest" is how Barbara Perry, director of presidential studies at the Miller Center at the University of Virginia, described it ahead of Trump's 100th day in office, which is coming up Saturday, April 29. "It's as steep as they come and ice-covered, and he didn't bring very many knowledgeable Sherpas with him."

Can all hope be lost?

I used to think not.

I used to think that no matter how tough life gets for people, they always have hope to cling to – to get them through it.

Then I met some Rohingya refugees on a trip to Bangladesh last month. Reporter Michael Sullivan and I were there to report on the latest wave of the Muslim minority group to flee over the border from Buddhist-majority Myanmar.

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