Strong Beginnings works to lower minority infant death rates in Kent County

A study released this week by the Michigan League for Public Policy concluded that while infant death numbers are down in the state of Michigan, African American infants have a death rate that’s twice as high as white infants. And Strong Beginnings in Grand Rapids is tackling the issue head on. Strong Beginnings is one of 100 federal healthy start programs around the country that are dedicated to improving infant mortality rates. The organization “seeks to promote racial equity and eliminate...

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An Inconvenient Sequel blows into town

Aug 11, 2017

Former Vice President Al Gore returns to the big screen with An Inconvenient Truth, plus two more sequels and a true story drama opens in theaters.  WGVU talks with Ron Van Timmeran from Celebration Cinema.

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   Thousands of Michiganders are were vindicated today The Unemployment Insurance Agency completed its review of tens of thousands of fraud cases today.

The review found that 44-thousand people were falsely accused of unemployment fraud between October of 20-13 and August of 20-15. A faulty computer system and a lack of oversight churned out tens of thousands of fraud accusations.

Agency director Wanda Stokes says they’ve implemented changes to make sure this doesn’t happen again.

 

criminallawyerillinois.org

The Michigan Court of Appeals has struck down a rule that says bars and party stores can’t sell “narcotics paraphernalia.”

The West Nile Virus has made its way to West Michigan. According to a press release by the Kent County Health Department, the discovery of the West Nile Virus in Grand Rapids is not a human case, but rather, came from a massive mosquito surveillance project conducted by the environmental health division. The positive sample was found in a pool of tested mosquitos collected from Grand Rapids’ 49507 zip code. 

grcity.us / City of Grand Rapids

Grand Rapids Downtown Development Authority approved the mixed-use development project featuring a movie theater complex.

If all goes as planned, the $140 million mixed-use project could break ground later this year. Celebration Cinema is investing $100 million devoted to a multi-screen movie theater called Studio C! located within the Arena South District at Oakes and Cherry Streets.

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Mourners will gather in South Carolina on Thursday for the funerals of the Rev. Sharonda Coleman-Singleton and Ethel Lance, two of the nine people who were killed during a Bible study meeting in Charleston last week.

Both Coleman-Singleton, 45, and Lance, 70, were integral members of Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church, where police say a white gunman attacked last week with the stated intention of killing black people. The case is being investigated as a hate crime.

Clinton County prosecutor Andrew Wylie told reporters late Wednesday night that Gene Palmer carried into the prison frozen patties of hamburger meat that may have had saw blades and drill bits stuffed inside.

The guard also allegedly showed convicted killers Richard Matt and David Sweat a utility catwalk area behind their cells, which the inmates later used as part of their escape.

The tragic events in Charleston this month have released years of racial and political tension in the South, and the pressure is being felt by Republican officeholders across the region.

Why the Republicans? Because it is increasingly difficult to find officeholders in the region who are not Republicans.

Taxi drivers in France formed virtual blockades around airports and key train stations Thursday, causing chaos in Paris and other French cities as part of a wide protest against the Uber ride-booking service, known in France as UberPOP.

Government and transportation officials urged travelers to take trains to many airports, as the roads around them were completely blocked.

When it comes to online video, the world is glued to YouTube. People watch billions of videos on it every day. And that huge share of online eyeballs is why other companies are trying to chip away at its dominance and lure some of its biggest stars away from the service.

Two minutes into Present Tense, a short film made by three high school students in a fishing village in the East African island of Zanzibar, a set of subtitles lay out their mission:

The Charleston, S.C., shootings have sparked lots of discussion about the Confederate battle flag, but it's not the only symbol of the Confederacy.

The Department of Homeland Security says it is changing its family detention policies, but critics say the steps don't go far enough.

Homeland Security Secretary Jeh Johnson says Immigration and Customs Enforcement will begin releasing families now being held at ICE facilities who are "successful in stating a case of credible or reasonable fear of persecution in their home countries."

The families will have to post a monetary bond or other condition of release.

In the wake of last week's Charleston, S.C., church shootings, 2016 Democratic presidential candidate Bernie Sanders explained his competing concerns between gun rights and gun safety.

"I think guns and gun control is an issue that needs to be discussed," Sanders told NPR's David Greene in an interview airing on Thursday's Morning Edition. "Let me add to that, I think that urban America has got to respect what rural America is about, where 99 percent of the people in my state who hunt are law abiding people."

At the hands of the Texas Legislature, the last four years have been long for supporters of abortion rights.

The next blow lands on July 1, when a new law will go into effect in Texas and drastically reduce access to abortion services — likely leaving just nine clinics that perform abortions open in the entire state.

The controversial law, passed in 2013, requires clinics to meet tougher building standards and doctors to have admitting privileges at a nearby hospital.

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