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L to R: Chief David Rahinsky, Je'Ana Mason, Danielle Mc Millon, Eugene Brown and Monica Sparks discuss 4Unity event in downtown Grand Rapids.
WGVU

GRPD Chief Rahinsky establishes youth advisory council

In an effort to gain a young adult’s perspective, Grand Rapids Police Chief David Rahinsky has launched a new advisory council made up of area youths. The council is called "IMPACT," and will give area high schoolers a chance to voice their opinions and advise Chief Rahinsky on current police issues. “The goal here is multi-faceted, so first and foremost we want feedback from the young people in our community in terms of ‘how are we doing’ how they perceive the police department, what we are...

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Downtown Grand Rapids
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Gentrification and displacement are words that make residents anxious when their neighborhoods are being bought out by folks with more money. Last night, at the Kroc Center, the city of Grand Rapids invited experts to meet with S. Division neighbors and talk about t these terms and how area specific plans come into the process. Inner-City Christian Federation President Ryan Ver Wys.

“Area Specific Plans are a way that we as a community name what’s important or what we would like to see happen in our community in the years to come.”

Christian McBride returns to St. Cecilia with new trio

16 hours ago
londonjazznews.com

Christian McBride brings his new trio Tip City to Grand Rapids, for a performance at St. Cecilia Music Center.  WGVU's Scott Vander Werf spoke with the jazz master and has this feature interview.

The State’s Board of Education can’t decide what to do about recent gun legislation.

   There are four Democrats and four Republicans on the board.       

That means the board can’t come to an agreement on a public position on bills that loosen restrictions on guns in schools.

The bills passed the state Senate last week. They would require schools to allow people with a special license to carry a concealed weapon on school grounds.

Michigan officials say the state's investigation into old tannery waste disposal has expanded. The state Department of Environmental Quality says it's now investigating 75 sites for toxic industrial chemicals that were used by Wolverine World Wide to waterproof shoes.

Department spokesperson Mel Brown says about 26 locations have been referred to the shoe manufacturer for further testing. State officials say the latest testing area includes about 100 homes in Rockford.

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A western Michigan school district has ended a teacher's faith-based discussions with elementary school students following complaints by a civil rights group.

Hudsonville Public Schools' assistant superintendent, Scott Smith, says the district didn't know a fifth-grade teacher had been meeting with students for lunchtime Bible studies until the Michigan Association of Civil Rights Activists contacted the district on Nov. 6.

Smith says officials met with the Alward Elementary School teacher the same day and ended his talks.

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When it comes to online video, the world is glued to YouTube. People watch billions of videos on it every day. And that huge share of online eyeballs is why other companies are trying to chip away at its dominance and lure some of its biggest stars away from the service.

Two minutes into Present Tense, a short film made by three high school students in a fishing village in the East African island of Zanzibar, a set of subtitles lay out their mission:

The Charleston, S.C., shootings have sparked lots of discussion about the Confederate battle flag, but it's not the only symbol of the Confederacy.

The Department of Homeland Security says it is changing its family detention policies, but critics say the steps don't go far enough.

Homeland Security Secretary Jeh Johnson says Immigration and Customs Enforcement will begin releasing families now being held at ICE facilities who are "successful in stating a case of credible or reasonable fear of persecution in their home countries."

The families will have to post a monetary bond or other condition of release.

In the wake of last week's Charleston, S.C., church shootings, 2016 Democratic presidential candidate Bernie Sanders explained his competing concerns between gun rights and gun safety.

"I think guns and gun control is an issue that needs to be discussed," Sanders told NPR's David Greene in an interview airing on Thursday's Morning Edition. "Let me add to that, I think that urban America has got to respect what rural America is about, where 99 percent of the people in my state who hunt are law abiding people."

At the hands of the Texas Legislature, the last four years have been long for supporters of abortion rights.

The next blow lands on July 1, when a new law will go into effect in Texas and drastically reduce access to abortion services — likely leaving just nine clinics that perform abortions open in the entire state.

The controversial law, passed in 2013, requires clinics to meet tougher building standards and doctors to have admitting privileges at a nearby hospital.

What are the makings of a great salad? You need fresh greens, of course, and then a layer of colorful vegetables like tomatoes and carrots.

That's a good start. But to help the body absorb more of the nutrients packed into this medley, you may want to add something else: a cooked egg.

The federal Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) will announce Thursday that it's going to crack down on hospitals, for the first time ever, to prevent an epidemic of back and arm injuries among nursing employees.

Nurses and nursing assistants suffer more of those debilitating injuries than any other occupation, and those injuries are caused mainly by moving and lifting patients.

The Senate handed President Obama a huge victory Wednesday afternoon, giving him final approval of legislation that enhances his power to negotiate trade deals.

The bill needed just 51 votes, but passed 60-38, making it look almost easy.

But earlier this month, the legislation granting Trade Promotion Authority seemed likely to die because of fierce opposition from many Democrats and some Republicans. Various legislative maneuvers were employed to set back the measure.

The director of the Office of Personnel Management underwent another grilling Wednesday, this time from members of the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee. Katherine Archuleta sat for more than three hours as lawmakers questioned her competence and her estimates of how many government workers may have had their data breached in the hacking of OPM's computers discovered this spring.

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