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Daniel Boothe

Use of out-of-state workers on BC Cobb demo job sparks Union protest

As demolition begins on the BC Cobb Power Plant in Muskegon, Union laborers are protesting North-Carolina based company Forsite Development outsourcing the demolition and reconstruction of the plant to out of state workers. “With Muskegon as we know, there is a lot of skilled labor of men and women here, that could perform this work,” Bill Kenney, the President of the Michigan Building Trades and Construction West Michigan chapter said. “So it’s important to us that with the medium income in...

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   Michigan has a growing number of inmates who are elderly, terminally ill, or otherwise medically frail.

   There is an effort underway to allow many of those felons to be released.

The state Department of Corrections says taxpayers spend millions of dollars on medical care for frail or dying inmates who no longer pose a risk to the public, but are not eligible for parole.

   But bills before the Legislature would allow felons who require advanced medical care to be paroled to a nursing home.

   Chris Gautz is with the Michigan Department of Corrections.

Former gymnastics doctor Larry Nassar, accused by dozens of women of sexual abuse, has been sentenced to serve 60 years in prison for possessing child pornography. 

Federal Judge Janet Neff handed down the sentence Thursday in Grand Rapids, saying Nassar should "never again have access to children. 

The 60 year prison sentence is not the end. In January, Nassar will be sentenced to molesting gymnasts with his hands  under the guise of providing treatment.

He has pled guilty. 

A group of Michigan lawmakers is asking the Environmental Protection Agency to do more to investigate nearly 30 toxic chemical contamination around the state. Eight Republicans and six Democrats signed a letter to the EPA on Tuesday asking the agency to help with the state's response to perfluoroalkyl and polyfluoroalkyl water pollution.

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The Grand Rapids Fire Department is warning residents to beware of a telemarketing scam that uses their name.  Officials with the department say don’t be fooled by telemarketers trying to get money over the phone.

“This isn’t uncommon. This happens from time to time, but as soon as we hear about it, we want to let citizenry know, that these are not operations that we’re involved in and most likely is some sort of criminal activity that’s going on.”

That’s Lieutenant William Smith, the Public Information Officer with the Grand Rapids Fire Department.

The remains of a West Michigan man killed when his plane crashed during World War II are coming home. The remains of Navy Airman Albert Rybarczyk of St. Joseph will be flown back to Michigan on Thursday. There will be a full military funeral on Monday and then Rybarczyk will be buried next to his parents at St. Joseph's Resurrection Cemetery. 

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The U.S. Supreme Court on Thursday handed the Obama administration a major victory on health care, ruling 6-3 that nationwide subsidies called for in the Affordable Care Act are legal.

"Congress passed the Affordable Care Act to improve health insurance markets, not to destroy them," the court's majority said in the opinion, which was written by Chief Justice John Roberts. But they acknowledged that "petitioners' arguments about the plain meaning ... are strong."

In the Medieval era, kings and queens hosted feasts adorned with surprisingly complex edible sculptures depicting humans and animals alike. Outside the castle walls, of course, people struggled to put enough food on the table — much less, worry about its presentation afterward. But in the modern United States, food sculpture is the art of the people. Nowhere is this truer than the butter sculptures so common at Midwestern state fairs.

The giant ostrich-like rhea, despite its largely useless vestigial wings, seems to be something of a flight risk.

Last year, we brought you the story of one of the birds — native to South America — that escaped from a farm in the U.K., startling cyclists and otherwise wreaking mayhem in the English countryside.

For the past 20 years, doctors have recommended that dialysis patients have a simple operation to make it safer and easier to connect to a machine that cleans their blood.

Islamic State fighters, who were ousted from the Kurdish border town of Kobani in January, have launched an offensive to recapture the Syrian city — setting off car bombs as a prelude to an attack, NPR's Deborah Amos reports.

Mourners will gather in South Carolina on Thursday for the funerals of the Rev. Sharonda Coleman-Singleton and Ethel Lance, two of the nine people who were killed during a Bible study meeting in Charleston last week.

Both Coleman-Singleton, 45, and Lance, 70, were integral members of Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church, where police say a white gunman attacked last week with the stated intention of killing black people. The case is being investigated as a hate crime.

Clinton County prosecutor Andrew Wylie told reporters late Wednesday night that Gene Palmer carried into the prison frozen patties of hamburger meat that may have had saw blades and drill bits stuffed inside.

The guard also allegedly showed convicted killers Richard Matt and David Sweat a utility catwalk area behind their cells, which the inmates later used as part of their escape.

The tragic events in Charleston this month have released years of racial and political tension in the South, and the pressure is being felt by Republican officeholders across the region.

Why the Republicans? Because it is increasingly difficult to find officeholders in the region who are not Republicans.

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