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MSU will pay Nassar victims over $500 million in settlement

Michigan State University confirms it is settling hundreds of lawsuits filed by survivors of Larry Nasser’s sexual abuse for a half-billion dollars. According to a press release from MSU , $425-million would be paid to current claimants. Those are the 332 sexual abuse survivors of Nassar. Another $75-million will be held in reserve for "future claimants alleging sexual abuse" by Nassar. It will not include confidentiality agreements or non-disclosure agreements. The release reported that MSU...

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Marijuana-infused beer, wine, and spirits would be outlawed under a bill adopted today  by the state Senate.

   The Senate vote took place with an eye toward the November ballot.

It’s looking increasingly likely voters will decide whether recreational marijuana will be legal in Michigan as the time for the Legislature to act grows short.

   State Senator Rick Jones he expects the question will be on the ballot, and it will be approved.  

“When the November ballot passes, Jennie, bar the door, it’s going to be the wild, wild west.”

 

Michigan State University faces a potential 500  million dollar settlement. But the school hasn’t said yet how it plans to pay the bill.

   Multiple lawmakers say not to ask them for help.

The lawsuit stems from how the university responded to former employee, Larry Nassar. He’s the sports doctor who will spend decades in prison for sexually assaulting his patients.

   The university announced a settlement with more than 300 Nassar survivors.

   But the school has yet to say where the money for the settlement will come from.

Amid growing concerns of contaminated water in the Belmont and Rockford areas, The University of Michigan hosted a webinar to discuss the history and effects of Per and Poly Fluorinated Chemicals that have contaminated hundreds of drinking water wells. Commonly referred to as PFAS, Dr. Rick Rediske of the Annis Water Resources Institute at Grand Valley State University met with other professors Wednesday in Ann Arbor to discuss the unfolding issues of groundwater contamination caused by the chemical.

  

Michigan's House has passed legislation that lets parents leave their newborns in secured boxes at hospitals, fire departments and police stations in addition to personally surrendering them to emergency services personnel and first responders.

Lawmakers approved the four-bill package Wednesday that amends the Safe Delivery of Newborns Law to allow for use of these baby boxes which the state Department of Health and Human Services would be tasked with regulating. The bill also redefines "newborn" as a child not older than 30 days.

Northern Michigan University has closed three campus buildings as a precautionary measure after initial water tests found inconsistent lead level readings. The school in Marquette announced Wednesday that the Physical Education and Instructional Facility, or PEIF; Thomas Fine Arts; and the Learning Resources Center will be closed until the school gets expedited results of additional tests. Those results could come over the weekend. The school will then make a determination of whether additional investigation and testing is required. The school is posting updates online .

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The U.S. Supreme Court on Thursday handed the Obama administration a major victory on health care, ruling 6-3 that nationwide subsidies called for in the Affordable Care Act are legal.

"Congress passed the Affordable Care Act to improve health insurance markets, not to destroy them," the court's majority said in the opinion, which was written by Chief Justice John Roberts. But they acknowledged that "petitioners' arguments about the plain meaning ... are strong."

In the Medieval era, kings and queens hosted feasts adorned with surprisingly complex edible sculptures depicting humans and animals alike. Outside the castle walls, of course, people struggled to put enough food on the table — much less, worry about its presentation afterward. But in the modern United States, food sculpture is the art of the people. Nowhere is this truer than the butter sculptures so common at Midwestern state fairs.

The giant ostrich-like rhea, despite its largely useless vestigial wings, seems to be something of a flight risk.

Last year, we brought you the story of one of the birds — native to South America — that escaped from a farm in the U.K., startling cyclists and otherwise wreaking mayhem in the English countryside.

For the past 20 years, doctors have recommended that dialysis patients have a simple operation to make it safer and easier to connect to a machine that cleans their blood.

Islamic State fighters, who were ousted from the Kurdish border town of Kobani in January, have launched an offensive to recapture the Syrian city — setting off car bombs as a prelude to an attack, NPR's Deborah Amos reports.

Mourners will gather in South Carolina on Thursday for the funerals of the Rev. Sharonda Coleman-Singleton and Ethel Lance, two of the nine people who were killed during a Bible study meeting in Charleston last week.

Both Coleman-Singleton, 45, and Lance, 70, were integral members of Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church, where police say a white gunman attacked last week with the stated intention of killing black people. The case is being investigated as a hate crime.

Clinton County prosecutor Andrew Wylie told reporters late Wednesday night that Gene Palmer carried into the prison frozen patties of hamburger meat that may have had saw blades and drill bits stuffed inside.

The guard also allegedly showed convicted killers Richard Matt and David Sweat a utility catwalk area behind their cells, which the inmates later used as part of their escape.

The tragic events in Charleston this month have released years of racial and political tension in the South, and the pressure is being felt by Republican officeholders across the region.

Why the Republicans? Because it is increasingly difficult to find officeholders in the region who are not Republicans.

Taxi drivers in France formed virtual blockades around airports and key train stations Thursday, causing chaos in Paris and other French cities as part of a wide protest against the Uber ride-booking service, known in France as UberPOP.

Government and transportation officials urged travelers to take trains to many airports, as the roads around them were completely blocked.

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