Camila Domonoske

Camila Flamiano Domonoske covers breaking news for NPR, primarily writing for the Two-Way blog.

She got her start at NPR with the Arts Desk, where she edited poetry reviews, wrote and produced stories about books and culture, edited four different series of book recommendation essays, and helped conceive and create NPR's first-ever Book Concierge.

With NPR's Digital News team, she edited, produced, and wrote news and feature coverage on everything from the war in Gaza to the world's coldest city. She also curated the NPR home page, ran NPR's social media accounts, and coordinated coverage between the web and the radio. For NPR's Code Switch team, she has written on language, poetry and race.

As a breaking news reporter, Camila has appeared live on-air for Member stations, NPR's national shows, and other radio and TV outlets. She's written for the web about police violence, deportations and immigration court, history and archaeology, global family planning funding, walrus haul-outs, the theology of hell, international approaches to climate change, the shifting symbolism of Pepe the Frog, the mechanics of pooping in space, and cats ... as well as a wide range of other topics.

She's a regular host of NPR's daily update on Facebook Live, "Newstime." She also co-created NPR's live headline contest, "Head to Head," with Colin Dwyer.

Every now and again, she still slips some poetry into the news.

Camila graduated from Davidson College in North Carolina.

A New Hampshire lottery winner can keep her cash and her anonymity, a judge has ruled.

The winner of a $560 million Powerball jackpot in January had signed her ticket with her name, as instructed by the state lottery website. That would make her name public.

She later realized that if she had signed it with the name of a trust instead, she could have kept her identity secret. But lottery officials said she couldn't change her mind.

The situation in besieged eastern Ghouta is dire and deteriorating.

The Syrian rebel-controlled Damascus suburb has been cut off from the world by the Assad regime and Russia. On Monday, civilians there finally received an aid convoy — a delivery that was overdue, inadequate, stripped by the Syrian regime of most medical supplies and cut short by ongoing hostilities.

Now the United Nations and nonprofit organizations say the partial aid delivery only highlights the desperate conditions in eastern Ghouta.

"Philando Feeds the Children," a fundraiser in memory of school cafeteria supervisor Philando Castile, who was shot and killed by a police officer in 2016, has paid all outstanding student lunch debt at all 56 schools in the St. Paul, Minn., Public School system.

"Philando is STILL reaching into his pocket, and helping a kid out," the charity wrote in an update posted last week. "One by one. With your help."

Updated at 5:25 p.m. ET

Aid supplies are beginning to reach the besieged community of Eastern Ghouta for the first time in weeks. But air strikes continued even during the aid delivery, despite the ostensible "humanitarian corridor" put in place by the Russian government, and dozens of civilians were killed in the Damascus suburb on Monday.

Days after a 7.5 magnitude earthquake struck the interior of Papua New Guinea, the death toll is continuing to rise as rescue workers strive to reach isolated communities despite blocked and damaged roads.

Officials said that at least 31 people were killed by the quake and subsequent landslides, more than double the initial reports, and that the toll is expected to rise further, Reuters reported on Thursday.

The wire service continued:

When the economy takes a turn for the worse, birth rates go down. It's both common sense and an empirically observed phenomenon.

But it's not the whole story.

A team of economists, taking a closer look at the connection between fertility and recessions, found that conception rates begin to drop before the economy starts its downturn — and could even be used to predict recessions.

Gobee is a no-go — at least in France.

France's first dockless bike-sharing program, which launched in October, has shut down operations across the country, citing "the mass destruction" of its fleet.

The decision to shut down on Saturday was "disappointing and extremely frustrating," the Hong Kong-based company wrote in its announcement. "We hoped for the best. But we were wrong ... In 4 months, 60% of our fleet was destroyed, stolen or privatized, making the whole European project no longer sustainable."

Just days after the U.N. Security Council demanded a 30-day ceasefire across Syria, heavy shelling has resumed in the Damascus suburb of Eastern Ghouta.

Meanwhile, according to Russian state media, Russian President Vladimir Putin has ordered a "humanitarian corridor" to allow civilians to leave the besieged region.

The area, held by rebels and under attack by the Syrian regime, has been targeted in a series of strikes over the past week — resulting in the deaths of more than 500 people, including many women and children, according to observer estimates.

African Matabele ants are fighters — several times a day, they leave their nests on raids, battling termite soldiers and dragging termite workers home for dinner.

They drag their fallen comrades back, too, bodies maimed by termite jaws.

Now German biologists have discovered what happens at the end of those rescue operations: Back at the nest, ants act as medics, cleaning the wounds of injured ants — and reducing their mortality rates in the process.

To the sound of an instrumental version of The Beatles' "A Day in the Life" — and the coordinated chanting of North Korea's tightly controlled cheering squad — figure skaters Ryom Tae Ok, 19, and Kim Ju Sik, 25, took to the ice Wednesday in their Olympic debut.

The athletes earned a personal best in their short program and were well-received by the crowd in Pyeongchang, South Korea.

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