Governor Rick Snyder

Water faucet
Public domain image / Wikimedia.org

Gov. Rick Snyder's administration is nearing completion of the country's strictest drinking water rules for lead.

It's a plan that would eventually result in the replacement of all 500,000 lead service pipes in Michigan despite opposition from municipalities and utilities.

Brian Whiston, State Superintendent, Michigan Department of Education
Dearborn Public Schools

State Superintendent Brian Whiston, who led the Michigan Department of Education since 2015, has died. He was 56.

The department said Whiston died Monday evening at his home, surrounded by family. He had gone on long-term disability leave Friday after being treated for cancer since last fall.

State education board co-presidents Casandra Ulbrich and Richard Zeile issued a statement Tuesday calling Whiston a "wonderful person who devoted his life to serving others." They say his vision to make Michigan a top 10 education state will endure.

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Michigan's public schools would receive their largest increase in base per-student funding in 17 years under a budget plan endorsed by the state House.

The Republican-controlled House approved the plan Tuesday, including a boost ranging from $120 to $240 per pupil proposed by Gov. Rick Snyder.

Once the Senate passes a proposal and revised revenue estimates are released, a budget agreement will be finalized in June.

michigan.gov

Republican gubernatorial candidate Brian Calley has officially been endorsed by Michigan Gov. Rick Snyder.

Snyder made the announcement with the lieutenant governor Wednesday at a construction company in the Detroit suburb of Southfield.

Snyder says he wants to pass the baton to someone who can take Michigan "to an even higher level." He says he has looked forward to endorsing Calley ever since he asked him to be his running mate eight years ago.

Snyder cannot run a third time because of term limits.

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Governor Rick Snyder has signed a budget bill that accelerates spending on road repairs in time to help with the spring and summer construction season.

The bill shifts $175 million from next year’s construction season to use this coming spring and summer to fix roads.

“You’re going to see a lot of (orange) barrels in every corner of Michigan,” he said.

Michigan lawmakers are comfortable with the state’s current driverless vehicle laws.

In 2016, the governor signed into law regulations on autonomous vehicles. Those also allow for testing of self-driving cars on state roads. But this week an autonomous vehicle struck and killed a pedestrian in Arizona.

Governor Rick Snyder has championed autonomous vehicles for a while. He said they need to find out all the issues associated with the death, but he’s not sure it will stall development of autonomous vehicles.

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Gov. Rick Snyder is seeking to boost base funding for most of Michigan's public schools by the largest dollar amount in more than 15 years. Snyder on Wednesday will ask lawmakers for a $240 per-pupil increase for school districts that get the minimum grant - a 3.1 percent boost for more than 75 percent of traditional schools and all charters. Higher-funded schools would get $120 more, a 1.4 percent increase.

Snyder also is proposing to shift $325 million in general funds to road repairs, more than double what's called for under law.

Courtesy Republican Governors Association

Governor Rick Snyder delivered his state of the state Tuesday evening, and touted Michigan's economic and fiscal gains under his watch, saying his tenure has had "huge ups and downs" but Michigan is better shape today than before he took office.

Water faucet
Public domain image / Wikimedia.org

Gov. Rick Snyder has signed a $52.8 million supplemental budget bill that includes money to respond to an emerging chemical contaminant found across Michigan.

The law enacted Wednesday allocates $23.2 million to address groundwater contamination from per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances, or PFAS, at 28 sites in 14 communities. It's recently drawn scrutiny north of Grand Rapids, where footwear company Wolverine World Wild dumped waste sludge decades ago.

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The Michigan Supreme Court says the state must return more than $550 million to school employees who had money deducted for retiree health care. T

he court ruled 6-0 Wednesday.

School employees had 3 percent of their pay deducted for about two years under a law signed by Gov. Jennifer Granholm, but the law was declared unconstitutional. Governor Rick Snyder in 2012 signed a new law that has survived court challenges. 

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