Hunting

A judge has ordered a 62-year-old hunter safety instructor to stand trial on a lesser charge in the fatal shooting of a 13-year-old boy who was squirrel hunting in western Michigan. Roger Hoeker of Jenison was charged with involuntary manslaughter, but 78th District Court Judge H. Kevin Drake this week sent the case to circuit court on a charge of reckless discharge of a firearm. 

State officials say five ruffed grouse have tested positive for the West Nile Virus. The Michigan Department of Natural Resources says it marks the first time the disease has been confirmed in the state's ruffed grouse population. The five birds were collected from August through October in Iron, Delta, Roscommon and Missaukee counties. Two were found dead and three were shot by hunters. 

Plans are being detailed for Ann Arbor's expanded 2018 deer hunt as part of the city's ongoing deer management efforts. The Ann Arbor News reports nonprofit contractor White Buffalo will complete sterilizations from Jan. 2-7 by tranquilizing up to 26 female deer and surgically removing their ovaries. 

A hunt to kill up to 250 deer is scheduled Jan. 8-31. A number of parks will be closed 3 p.m.-midnight every day for the hunt. It could be the city's biggest hunt if it goes according to plan. A total of 156 deer were killed during hunts the last two winters.

Ann Arbor expanding 2018 hunt to manage deer population

Oct 17, 2017

Ann Arbor plans to expand its 2018 deer hunt as part of the city's ongoing deer management efforts. The Ann Arbor News reports City Council and the mayor voted Monday to update the city's 2017-18 budget to spend another roughly $36,000 on its contract with the nonprofit White Buffalo, which has worked on hunts over the past two winters. 

US agency's bid to allow trumpeter swan hunting draws fire

Oct 16, 2017

A federal plan to let hunters shoot trumpeter swans has drawn fire from some of the people who toiled to bring the majestic white birds back from the brink of extinction. Trumpeter swans have made a comeback thanks to efforts to reintroduce them. Now the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is working on a plan aimed at letting hunters shoot them in states that allow the hunting of tundra swans, a more numerous species. 

If you're a hunter who shoots deer or related animals in other states, be advised that there are new rules about bringing their parts into Michigan. The tougher regulations are intended to prevent the spread of chronic wasting disease among Michigan's deer, elk and moose. The illness attacks the central nervous system of animals in the deer family and can eventually kill them. Nine free-ranging deer in Michigan have tested positive since April 2015.

A new computer application enables Michigan residents to help conserve fish and wildlife by reporting what they see while out in the field. The Eyes in the Field app replaces 15 separate forms that the state Department of Natural Resources previously used to gather this kind of information.

State conservation officers are appealing to the public for tips about the illegal killing of two deer in Tuscola County. The Michigan Department of Natural Resources says remains of the 8- and 9-point bucks were found Tuesday night. They were in a ditch near the intersection of Michigan Highway 25 and Clark Road in Akron Township.

Hunters interested in going after antlerless deer can apply for licenses over the next month. The Michigan Department of Natural Resources says the application period begins Saturday and continues through Aug. 15. Hunters may apply for one license in any open Deer Management Unit statewide. The nonrefundable fee is $5. Hunters can seek either one private-land or one public-land license online, or at any authorized license agent or DNR Customer Service Center.

Michigan wildlife officials are hosting three bear hunting clinics at the Carl T. Johnson Hunt and Fish Center in Cadillac. The Department of Natural Resources' Outdoor Skills Academy says the programs are scheduled for July 29, Aug. 5 and Aug. 6. Experienced hunters and DNR personnel will serve as instructors. Subjects will include habitat, gear, stand placement, baiting, rules and regulations, carcass care and hide care. 

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