politics

Michigan Republicans have not given up on efforts to keep Democrat Melissa Gilbert on the November ballot despite her wishes and those of her party.

A state elections board declined a GOP request to launch a closer review of whether her request to exit the 8th Congressional District race is sincere, or meant to simply bail on a campaign where she stumbled time and time again.

The former child star of Little House on the Prairie won the uncontested Democratic primary, but now says painful back and neck troubles make her unable to campaign or serve if elected.

Flickr via Wikimedia | CC BY 2.0 / wikimedia.org

Former Michigan Governor Jennifer Granholm will have a key role in democratic nominee Hillary Clinton’s potential move into the White House.

The Clinton campaign announced Tuesday that Granholm is a co-chair on Clinton’s transition team.

Much like the old saying about raising a child, it takes a village to transition a person from candidate to president. It’s a process that starts long before a winner is even announced.

Donald Trump campaign photo; Cheyna Roth / donaldjtrump.com; Michigan Public Radio Network

Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump and Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton were both in Michigan this month to deliver speeches on their plans for the economy.

But they both presented different pictures of the state of things here in Michigan, where the auto industry and manufacturing tanked during the Great Recession. 

So, what’s the state of the recovery here in Michigan? Michigan Public Radio’s Lansing bureau chief, Rick Pluta, asked an expert – Michigan State University economics professor Charlie Ballard.

Donald Trump is scheduled to hold a campaign rally near Lansing later this week. 

The Republican presidential candidate will rally supporters Friday afternoon at the Summit Sports and Ice Complex in Eaton County's Windsor Township.

It is Trump's second visit to Michigan in as many weeks, following his economic speech in Detroit last week.

The public can request tickets on a first-come, first-served basis on Trump's campaign website.

www.zdnet.com

THE ISSUE: 

Pariah state North Korea could soon be capable of targeting America with nuclear weapons. Economic sanctions and diplomatic isolation have failed to halt its progress. What can the U.S. do to stop the authoritarian government from building up a nuclear arsenal that threatens the United States and its allies in Asia?

WHERE THEY STAND: 

Hillary Clinton speaks in Warren on Thursday, August 11.
Cheyna Roth

Millions of Americans would be put to work if Hillary Clinton is elected president. That was the promise the candidate delivered in Metro Detroit on Thursday.

Clinton said Republican nominee Donald Trump is presenting a dismal and incorrect picture of Michigan’s economy. She pushed back at Trump’s economic plans while at an advanced manufacturing plant in Warren.

Clinton commented on immigration, raising the minimum wage, and Trump’s plan to eliminate the Estate Tax, which she says will not help 99.8 percent of Americans.

www.zdnet.com

THE ISSUE:

About 9 in 10 Americans now have health insurance, more than at any time in history. But progress is incomplete, and the future far from certain. Millions remain uninsured. Quality is still uneven. Costs are high and trending up again. Medicare's insolvency is two years closer, now projected in 2028. Every family has a stake.

WHERE THEY STAND:

www.zdnet.com

THE ISSUE:

Who should be able to vote and how easy should it be?

It's a question that goes to the core of democracy. Voting rights are in flux in the final months of Barack Obama's two terms as the first black president. Citing a need to combat fraud, Republican-controlled legislatures are tightening voter laws by limiting early voting and same-day registration, by requiring IDs at polling places, and more.

Trump blames globalism for industrial state ills

Aug 9, 2016
Photo of Trump speech in Detroit.
Rick Pluta / MPRN

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump blasted incompetent politicians, unfair international trade deals, and high taxes in a speech Monday in Detroit.

The address before the Detroit Economic Club was billed as a major policy speech.

Trump said industrial cities like Detroit are still struggling while current policies send jobs and wealth to other countries. He promised to change that.

“The Motor City will come roaring back – roaring back,” Trump said to the cheers of a capacity crowd in Cobo Center.

Rick Pluta

Hundreds of demonstrators waved signs and chanted slogans as Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump addressed a business lunch inside a Detroit convention center.

Jan Tjernlund carried a sign that said “Trump the Divider.” She says she doesn’t like what Trump has had to say about women, minorities, and immigration.

She says Trump doesn’t understand government and is temperamentally unfit to serve, and she has fears for the nation’s stability if he’s elected.

"I am concerned about the future of everything," Tjernlund says.

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