U.S. Supreme Court

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Supreme Court justices suggested Tuesday that they would side with a Native American tribe in Michigan in a case that arose out of the tribe's construction of a casino.

The case the justices heard oral argument on Tuesday has already been to the Supreme Court once.

Courthouse
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The Supreme Court has upheld a lower court's ruling that said significant changes to Michigan's sex offender registry law could not be applied retroactively.

Michigan asked the high court to take up the issue after a 2016 federal appeals court ruling, but the Supreme Court declined in an order Monday.

The appeals court said that retroactively applying the changes to people already on the list would unconstitutionally increase punishments after offenders' convictions.

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The Supreme Court won't take up a challenge to a Michigan law that allows the state to temporarily take away local officials' authority during financial crises and appoint an emergency manager.

The Supreme Court declined Monday to hear the case.

Voters and elected officials were challenging a state law that says that to rescue financially stressed cities and school districts the state can reassign the governing powers of local officials to a state-appointed emergency manager.

An emergency manager was in place during the water crisis in Flint.

U.S. Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor has challenged the University of Michigan to get more black students as she received an honorary degree from the school. Asked Monday about what public universities will look like in the decades ahead, Sotomayor said they're going to "look a lot like" the University of Michigan but more diverse - a remark that drew applause. She says the number of black students at the Ann Arbor school is a "real problem."

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A federal appeals court says it’s too late to go back and re-hash the "Grand Bargain" that allowed Detroit to emerge from bankruptcy two years ago.

In a split decision, a panel of the Sixth Circuit U.S. Court of Appeals rejected a challenge filed by five city of Detroit retirees. They say the city shouldn’t be allowed to reduce their benefits after they retired.

But the court said re-visiting the controversy could unravel the deal, and would stoke uncertainty.

The court said that would be unfair to other creditors, and hundreds of thousands of Detroit residents.

Hilary Farrell

Michigan voters will continue to have the option of using one mark on the ballot to support a political party’s entire slate of candidates in November.

The U.S. Supreme Court has denied Michigan Attorney General Bill Schuette’s request to reverse two lower courts and allow a ban on straight-ticket voting to take effect.

Mark Brewer is one the attorneys who challenged Michigan’s ban on straight-ticket voting. He called it a victory for voters.

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A legal drama over Michigan’s November election ballot could land next on the steps of the United States Supreme Court.

A federal appeals court has denied Michigan Attorney General Bill Schuette’s request for a review of the straight-ticket voting controversy.

Republicans in the Legislature adopted a bill signed into law by Governor Rick Snyder earlier this year law that banned the practice of allowing voters to support a political party’s entire slate of candidates with a single mark on the ballot.

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There will be a new round of court filings this week in the battle to get marijuana legalization on the November ballot. 

The MI Legalize campaign is expected to file a set of motions Tuesday in an effort to get the case settled in time for the November 2016 election.

Last June, the organization filed a lawsuit with the Michigan Court of Claims challenging a signature rule. The rule says any signatures for a petition gathered outside a 180-day window are invalid.

The state of Michigan is asking a higher court to stop a federal judge from interfering in the resentencing of so-called juvenile lifers.

The attorney general's office is accusing Judge John Corbett O'Meara of a "deep, unwarranted intrusion" on the rights of prosecutors.

The state wants a federal appeals court to suspend or throw out a restraining order that halts the resentencing process.

Courthouse
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The Supreme Court is taking up an appeal from an 11-year-old Michigan girl with cerebral palsy who wasn't allowed to bring her service dog to school.

The justices said Tuesday they will consider whether Ehlena Fry's family can sue the school district for violations of federal disability laws.

Fry's family obtained a goldendoodle to help her open doors and retrieve items. Her school district initially refused to allow Wonder at school.

Officials relented a bit in 2010, but they placed many restrictions on Wonder.

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