Water

Battle Creek officials have lifted a drinking water advisory they'd issued after elevated levels of manganese were found in the water last week.

The order to lift the advisory was issued Saturday and was approved by the Calhoun County Department of Public Health and Michigan Department of Environmental Quality and Health and Human Services.

Water parks are scheduled to open May 25 at three Michigan state parks. The Department of Natural Resources calls the parks "floating playgrounds."

Water Warrior Island is in the Upper Peninsula on Lake Michigamme at Van Riper State Park in Marquette County. Jump Island is on Bishop Lake in Livingston County's Brighton Recreation Area, while the WhoaZone is at Heron Beach at the Holly Recreation Area in Oakland County.

Water Warrior Island features 20-foot water slides. Jump Island has an inflatable iceberg slide. The WhoaZone has an obstacle course.

Water faucet
Public domain image / Wikimedia.org

Gov. Rick Snyder's administration is nearing completion of the country's strictest drinking water rules for lead.

It's a plan that would eventually result in the replacement of all 500,000 lead service pipes in Michigan despite opposition from municipalities and utilities.

Water faucet
Public domain image / Wikimedia.org

Michigan regulators are cracking down on municipal sewage plants in an effort to decrease the amount of chemicals flowing into the Great Lakes.

MLive.com reports that the Michigan Department of Environmental Quality wants the plants to treat industrial wastewater and determine which customers are using the per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances that are contaminating water supplies across the state.

Emails indicate the Michigan Department of Environmental Quality may not have immediately acted on a warning regarding groundwater contaminated by waste from a footwear manufacturer.

Emails obtained by The Grand Rapids Press show that state geologist Mark Worrall told the department in April that homes south of Wolverine World Wide's sludge dump should be tested for toxic chemicals.

The emails indicate the department didn't begin testing homes in that area until July. Many weren't looked at until September.

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Recent water tests at elementary schools in Flint have found an increase in samples showing lead levels above the federal action limit.

The Flint Journal reports the Michigan Department of Environmental Quality determined that 28 samples tested in February were above 15 parts per billion of lead. That compares to 20 such samples in January.

Department spokesman George Krisztian says the increase may be due to changes in testing conditions, such as the decision to collect samples before flushing lines.

Health and environmental regulators across Michigan are playing catch-up with industrial chemicals that remain in the ground or water long after initially being discovered. The state has a list of more than 3,000 vapor intrusion sites.  The overwhelming number of locations means state regulators wait to be informed about problems by property owners, complaints from neighbors, environmental assessments required for construction projects or reviews mandated by the Environmental Protection Agency.

John Austin,

The world is experiencing a new industrial transformation. A new report by the Michigan Economic Center says the state is positioned to grow hundreds of businesses and tens of thousands of new jobs. WGVU talks with the report’s lead author about how Michigan can be a leader in emerging sectors.

“We benefited and helped lead one economic transformation, the great industrial economy.”

John Austin is Director of the Michigan Economic Center and lead author of a new report, “Jobs, Michigan, and Leadership in the Economy of Tomorrow”

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The head of Flint schools wants a comprehensive plan from the state that includes multiple rounds of testing of faucet and drinking fountain water for lead.

Flint Community Schools Superintendent Bilal Tawwab says Wednesday during a news conference that students will not be allowed to drink from the tap until officials and health professionals are satisfied with the water's safety.

He says the district will continue to use bottled water. The district serves about 4,500 students.

Water faucet
Public domain image / Wikimedia.org

Gov. Rick Snyder has signed a $52.8 million supplemental budget bill that includes money to respond to an emerging chemical contaminant found across Michigan.

The law enacted Wednesday allocates $23.2 million to address groundwater contamination from per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances, or PFAS, at 28 sites in 14 communities. It's recently drawn scrutiny north of Grand Rapids, where footwear company Wolverine World Wild dumped waste sludge decades ago.

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