Mutually Inclusive

A WGVU initiative in partnership with the W.K. Kellogg Foundation using on-air programs and community events to explore issues of inclusion and equity.

Downtown Grand Rapids
Wikimedia.org

Gentrification and displacement are words that make residents anxious when their neighborhoods are being bought out by folks with more money. Last night, at the Kroc Center, the city of Grand Rapids invited experts to meet with S. Division neighbors and talk about t these terms and how area specific plans come into the process. Inner-City Christian Federation President Ryan Ver Wys.

“Area Specific Plans are a way that we as a community name what’s important or what we would like to see happen in our community in the years to come.”

Mariano Avila / WGVU

Engaging Community. It may sound simple, but it’s the question as development in Grand Rapids continues to boom. Recently, community members who didn’t agree with Amplify GR’s community engagement tactics shut down a meeting. Now, we’ll get to what some community organizations are doing to influence this conversation. But let’s start with the city.

“Tonight we wanted to hear from people who attended—the residents of the neighborhood, business owners, property owners—to get their input on how they want to be engaged in this process.”

Grand Valley State University

Weekly we focus on the work of area organizations and individuals advancing inclusion and equity in our community. This morning we talk about equity, civil discourse and civic engagement with Dr. Mladjo Ivanovic, a visiting professor of philosophy at Grand Valley State University. Joining the conversation is WGVU grant writer, Steve Chappell, project director of WGVU’s grant from the W.K. Kellogg Foundation in the area of racial equity.

Weekly we focus on the work of area organizations and individuals advancing inclusion and equity in our community. This morning we talk with Juan Mascorro-Guerrero, a DACA recipient and senior at Grand Valley State University. Joining the conversation is WGVU grant writer, Steve Chappell, project director of WGVU’s grant from the W.K. Kellogg Foundation in the area of racial equity.

Mariano Avila / WGVU

It’s early in the morning and Martel Posey, the new executive director of Spokes Folks, is making arrangements to move an entire bike shop gifted to his organization from a donor in Bay City to Grand Rapids.

“Forty bikes, a bunch of tools, and a bunch of just boxes of parts that have been sitting there for a while now. And they thought it would be the perfect place to continue the story.”

Screenshot / WGVU

UPDATE: GRCRC issued a statement of thanks to Flamingo Lounge for apologizing and canceling the event. 

The Grand Rapids Community Relations Commission issued a press release encouraging respect and cultural sensitivity during costume events following an incident in which a West Side bar promoted a party themed Cowboys and Indians. For WGVU’s Mutually Inclusive Mariano Avila has the story.

“Nobody wants to get a press release calling them out for their behavior.”

Weekly we focus on the work of area organizations and individuals advancing inclusion and equity in our community. This morning we talk with Al Vanderberg, Ottawa County Administrator, about the Ottawa County Cultural Intelligence Committee. Joining the conversation is WGVU grant writer, Steve Chappell, project director of WGVU’s grant from the W.K. Kellogg Foundation in the area of racial equity.

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