Supply Management Research

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West Michigan’s economy continued its positive growth pattern in September. WGVU breaks down the numbers in the recent Supply Management Research survey.

“This trend has continued through September and it appears right now to probably continue through the fall and possibly even into the next year.” That’s Brian G. Long, director of Supply Management Research in the Seidman College of Business at Grand Valley State University. He explains there are two areas of strength. The first is a rebound in auto sales both new and used.

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The most recent Supply Management Research survey indicates the West Michigan’s economy is experiencing slower growth.

“This month we had a sharper drop in auto sales than we’ve had in any of the previous months this year.” That’s Brian G. Long, director of Supply Management Research in the Seidman College of Business at Grand Valley State University.

He explains July marked the sixth straight month auto sales have been down year over year. “That means that we are reaching that level of saturation that we all knew we were going to meet eventually.”

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West Michigan’s economy continued to outperform during the month of May. WGVU breaks down the latest Supply Management Research survey.

The employment rate across much of West Michigan is a clear sign of economic strength.

“When we have Ottawa County at 2.1 percent unemployment and all of Kent County at 2.4 percent unemployment we have to conclude that the employment situation has improved and the unemployment situation is much, much better than it was at the peak of this recession.”

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West Michigan’s economy remains strong after two months of double-digit growth. But there are signs the Trump rally may be slowing. WGVU breaks down the latest Supply Management Research survey.

“We are at a two year high right now.” In particular, the Supply Management Research index for employment and new orders. “But we can’t expect that to continue. We have some industries in our area, namely automotive and office furniture that are at or near their two year highs themselves. As a result, we look forward to some slackening as far as the industry is concerned.”

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The West Michigan economy in October entered into what is being described as a slow, shallow growth period. What’s causing the flattening?

The October economic slowdown was triggered by a slowdown in auto sales and that’s impacting local parts suppliers.

The West Michigan economy, while still positive, backtracked a bit in August. That’s the finding for the August Supply Management Research survey. Its author attributes it to the “summer doldrums.”

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The West Michigan economy has been stuck in a slow growth pattern. The economic data from the month of May’s Supply Management Research survey indicates the local economy has turned to “flat growth.”

May was a rough month for U.S. auto sales. General Motors sales fell 18 percent and Ford dropped six percent from a year earlier. Domestic and foreign automakers experienced declines.

Brian G. Long, director of Supply Management Research in the Seidman College of Business at Grand Valley State University tells us the May auto report has turned West Michigan’s economy flat.

The West Michigan economy continued its slow growth pattern in April.

West Michigan industry remains stable and positive. Brian G. Long, director of Supply Management Research in the Seidman College of Business has released his April survey indicating, and as he puts it, the local economy is “Still rising.”

“If we had to look forward to the summer we would have took at what the auto industry is doing and what the office furniture industry is doing and both of these industries are doing very well.”

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The west Michigan economy got off to a crawl in January. Then the calendar flipped and new orders came pouring in - kick-starting the local economy in February. WGVU takes a closer look at the February Supply Management Research survey.

“We had a very anemic month as the New Year opened and we started to worry a little bit.”

Brian G. Long, director of Supply Management Research in the Seidman College of Business described economic growth as “slowing to a crawl” in his January Supply Management Research survey.

The first of West Michigan’s economic data for the New Year has been analyzed and January’s Supply Management Research survey describes the growth as “slowing to a crawl.” WGVU takes a look at the numbers.

“The numbers that we have coming in are just very barely positive and some of them are just slightly negative but on the average we have to say that the economy in West Michigan is flat.”
 

That’s Brian G. Long, director of Supply Management Research in the Seidman College of Business at Grand Valley State University.

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